Category: Asia-Pacific Trade Insights

The Asia-Pacific Circle publishes timely Asia-Pacific Insights and Thought Leadership, in good business intelligence. This page regroups the thinking of the Circle’s contributors related to global and Asia-Pacific Trade. From local pro-business or interventionist policies to free trade negotiations and leadership – not to forget our China-United States trade insights – our experts’ Asia-Pacific Trade Insights connect the dots.


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Asia-Pacific Insights?

Are you looking for a big picture approach to regional developments? From Financial Markets to trade diplomacy and geopolitics, The Asia-Pacific Circle connects the dots in good business intelligence. [Read out Asia-Pacific Insights and Thought Leadership].


Read our Asia-Pacific Trade Insights:

 

 

An EU Strategy on connecting Europe to Asia… the European way?

In this Asia-Pacific Insight originally published in the South China Morning Post, Philippe Bonnet and Antoine Martin comment on the recent of an EU-Asia Connectivity strategic policy proposal by the European Commission. Whilst building ties between Asia and Europe make a lot of sense from a business cooperation perspective, they write, trying to create connectivity "the European way" - i.e. by imposing a rules-based mindset to Asia - is a rather surprising idea. A change in mindsets would be interesting, however...

Blue Pill – Red Pill Moment for Korean Trade and Investment Policy

In this Insight, Soo-Hyun Lee (Asan Institute, Seoul) discusses developments in South Korea's trade and investment climate. Borrowing the blue pill - red pill image from The Matrix, he places South Korea's approach to liberal policies into the broader and more global context of political and economic alliances with the West, and particularly the United States. The blue pill, on the one hand, equals safety and stability. The red pill, on the other hand, would bring some public interest and independence, provided of course that the country departs from its current ways. The question overall comes as follows: could South Korea follow a different roadmap in the future?

Trump against China: Bump, Chaos or K.O.?

In this insight, Paul Clerc-Renaud analyses the so-called Trade War which has opposed China and the United States since the arrival to power of President Trump. He comments on the various progress made by the Chinese over the past few years, provides a summary of the recent trade sanctions put into place by Washington and Beijing, and considers why the tensions have arisen. Technological progress, he concludes, is at the root of the problem, and chances are that Beijing's 'Made in China 2025' are the actual reason why the U.S. is so embarrassed with China's development.

China’s Telecom Markets: a Structurally Globalized Industry?

Telecom talk, with Alain Lejeune (TLC Communications, BlackBerry Mobile Division): In this Chinese markets insight, Alain Lejeune explores past, current and future developments in China's Telecoms market. From the rise of a market to the development of a truly globalized telecommunication industry strategically supported under the "Made in China 2025" efforts, Mr Lejeune tells a fascinating industrial story built around innovation, forward-looking anticipation, daring business models and far-reaching investments. In case you wondered what global (and Chinese) telecoms are about, this insight is a must read. Would you like more business trends and tips from regional Asia-Pacific experts? Read our latest Asia-Pacific Insights!

JEEPA: Understanding the EU – Japan Economic Partnership Agreement.

Asia-Pacific Insights: Japan - EU relations | The EU-Japan Economic Partnership Agreement (JEEPA) represents an important opportunity from a business and trade leadership perspective. On the business side of things, Japan and the European Union are historical trading partners. Hence, the Economic Partnership Agreement represents a significant opportunity for both countries to keep progressing... together. On the trade diplomacy perspective, the JEEPA also sends an important leadership signal. Global free trade dynamics have been altered and sided away since late 2016 and the arrival to power of President Trump. The withdrawal of the United States from the TPP agreement, indeed, had slowed the trade dynamics globally. With the JEEPA, however

What the Japan EU free trade agreement (JEEPA) actually says.

Japan - Europe free trade insights: The Japan EU free trade agreement (JEEPA) is a fairly comprehensive agreement which answers the most pressing issues in international trade and investment regulation. From a facilitation perspective, the agreement contains the typical provisions on the market. Note, for instance, that the scope of application is very broad and tends to prohibit "any duty or charge of any kind". Otherwise, the agreement facilitates trade in services, trade in financial services, investment and e-commerce whilst ensuring fair competition and intellectual property rights preservation. At the same time, the agreement does not only open free trade, it also preserves some regulatory room to Japan and the …

South Korea cannot afford to let The Corporate Restructuring Promotion Act go.

Asia-Pacific Trade Insights: Expert Soo-Hyun Lee (Asan Institute, Seoul) comments on the impact of the expiration of the South Korean Corporate Restructuring Promotion Act. While the act has helped major companies restructure in times of economic duress for the past twenty years, it has expired in late June 2018, thus leaving South Korea's giants without a much-needed support. Asking what ought to be the Korean Government’s economic role (i.e. letting things happen or supporting businesses in difficult times), Soo-Hyun Lee writes that Seoul cannot let go of the Act. Keep reading for more.

Interventionism in Korea and Japan: Complex Investment Climates Ahead?

Asia-Pacific Insight: Soo-Hyun Lee (Asan Institute, Seoul) discusses the recent interventionist policies of the governments of South Korea and Japan. From banks to shipyards and technology industries, Japan and Korea have stepped into the business realm at multiple occasions in the name of the public interest. Yet, questions remain as to what are the consequences of these policies on the two countries' domestic investment climates.  From an international legal point of view, Lee concludes, the legitimacy of a government intervention ultimately depends on procedural fairness. South Korea and Japan need to proceed with care: without procedural fairness, public interventions can easily shift matters of public interest into bad business and investment climates.

Trade Insights: Trump, China, and a Tale of Aluminum and Steel Tariffs

US - China Trade Insights: Antoine Martin and Professor Bryan Mercurio (The Chinese University of Hong Kong) discuss China - United States relations in light of recent trade developments. With the announcement of new tariffs against Chinese steel and Aluminum, President Trump has forced President Xi to react. This analysis of the'trade war' developments leads to the conclusion that the political game is changing. On the one hand, the U.S. is turning nationalistic and protectionist, even if it harms itself in the process. On the other, China is reversing the usual rhetoric and positioning itself as the god international citizen who plays by the rules. Keep reading for more.

World trade derails? It’s all Uber’s fault!

We are living in troubled times. The British are paving their way out of the EU (trying, anyway), the major agreements which were once expected to foster growth between the United States, Europe, the Asia Pacific or Canada are seriously compromised. Trade has shifted from policy goal to political incorrectness. Let's face it

The US – China agreement on steel overcapacity: no impact on trade & international affairs.

Asia-Pacific Insight: The steel industry is one of China's most significant industries, but it lives difficult times at the moment. In fact, steel overcapacity in China is not just a reality, it has become a source of diplomatic troubles. In this China insight, Antoine Martin comments on the Agreement reached by the United States and China on the matter. He concludes that little change is to be expected. Beijing has little margin of maneuver on the topic, hence overcapacity is likely to remain a burden in China-US relations.

Does China have a (non) market economy status?

Whether or not China should be considered as a market economy country is a polemical topic at the moment. On the one hand, Beijing claims that it has made significant efforts to open its economy to world markets since its accession to the WTO. On the other hand, the major competing countries such as the United States or the European Union complain that such effort are not significant enough and argue that China should not be considered a market economy. In this China business insight, Antoine Martin comments on recent EU and US talks regarding the issue.